The President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act mandates that all JFK assassination records must be fully declassified by 26 October, 2017.

 

JULY 24, 2017 – JFK ASSASSINATION RECORDS – NARA ONLINE DOCUMENTS RELEASE

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JFK Assassination Records – 2017 Additional Documents Release

The National Archives and Records Administration is releasing documents previously withheld in accordance with the JFK Assassination Records Collection Act.  The vast majority of the Collection (88%) has been open in full and released to the public since the late 1990s.  The records at issue are documents previously identified as assassination records, but withheld in full or withheld in part.  Learn more

This release consists of 3,810 documents, including 441 formerly withheld-in-full documents and 3,369 documents formerly released with portions redacted.  The documents originate from FBI and CIA series identified by the Assassination Records Review Board as assassination records.  More releases will follow.

To view the entire file, you may visit the National Archives at College Park and request access to the original records.

Accessing the Release Files

Each release file is a ZIP file containing copies of the records and a corresponding XLSX spreadsheet with metadata about each file.

To access the files, you will need:

  • decompression software such as WinZip to “unzip” the contents
  • software such as Adobe Acrobat to view the PDF files
  • software such as Windows Media Player to listen to the WAV files
  • software such as Microsoft Excel to view the XLSX spreadsheet

Once a file has been unzipped, use the XLSX spreadsheet to understand the content and context of each file.

Files

July 2017 Release – Formerly Released in Part – Part 1 of 4 (Zip – 536MB)

Content List (XLSX – 167KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: 5bfd47833a8384ab1ccba7be92f39063
  • SHA1: cca367fecbe42c76530a46be2db3fd409b373666

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Released in Part – Part 2 of 4 (Zip – 596MB)

Content List (XLSX – 162KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: efae44b120084933d0a63b91cf8803b0
  • SHA1: 26885b1ac0fb6e80041dd2aa216f9c59b84a61cf

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Released in Part – Part 3 of 4 (Zip – 390MB)

Content List (XLSX – 203KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: 0fda31cff62afc9e9aa4b8610ee26bc4
  • SHA1: 2d515f594a1495a09a986b6cf5dcaf06efb79ce8

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Released in Part – Part 4 of 4 (Zip – 496MB)

Content List (XLSX – 141KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: f7bb377f1e967d87aa93bb3fa93be0fc
  • SHA1: 9496e32d6afad7b8a10c53e62317faee7b1ebcee

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 1 of 18 (Zip – 1.1GB)

Content List (XLSX – 22KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: 0f2c5a77e8a2cd5adb6a94b333b6b704
  • SHA1: 99e9b3dab9b2387b2b4e0d3bbe8775556015fab8

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 2 of 18 (Zip – 960MB)

Content List (XLSX – 17KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: 711cc2b4692ad460cc899277d55f94f7
  • SHA1: 02ebdf2c551f6c2152ccea8c3a76b60444942796

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 3 of 18 (Zip – 648MB)

Content List (XLSX – 12KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: 852ec1995f0027bc00a7c5688319cbbd
  • SHA1: fa1d3fdf06489fd852cfe41c4a9a0567d1d36b74

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 4 of 18 (Zip – 1.4GB)

Content List (XLSX – 11KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: ab22262cdeba6f28498a249d22f61118
  • SHA1: 364947438406bc46dde6414f159d778c3d7daa6b

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 5 of 18 (Zip – 580MB)

Content List (XLSX – 23KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: fc81e8ad7d94c79f2ae5b01a7271d810
  • SHA1: 9069763e95d27aa0e7edb6466243352db08a01b8

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 6 of 18 (Zip – 235MB)

Content List (XLSX – 22KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: 4e290ab81d548dbacdc00f434dbb9158
  • SHA1: 3ab35ca05cda2fc22ae49ed0f64242a8bf0cf708

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 7 of 18 (Zip – 852MB)

Content List (XLSX – 9KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: 8758af630c979edcbd74c9669ebe5a82
  • SHA1: 656d5082e05f490b6b31fe7057d42d1734ad740f

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 8 of 18 (Zip – 825MB)

Content List (XLSX – 9KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: 0a4439e303ad6498a33e4bdf2b8cacaf
  • SHA1: 5d50ae8e239ced16240eabbf40776ecc6798fade

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 9 of 18 (Zip – 1.6GB)

Content List (XLSX – 9KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: ca396433127de82a6f2b11dcdf8aaf9c
  • SHA1: 932fab93d6966fa75d22b739c94b955fce0cfc63

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 10 of 18 (Zip – 946MB)

Content List (XLSX – 9KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: 3f181a79e42a88ac1a568e2504bbd089
  • SHA1: 9ef5cf9bec87aaa992440cda6f09bb37065eadaa

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 11 of 18 (Zip – 1.2GB)

Content List (XLSX – 9KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: 093bc83cbae8a7a803582a28f93aca13
  • SHA1: cf0ce9a06c101d4a0e5346702a709c8c2839442f

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 12 of 18 (Zip – 1.1GB)

Content List (XLSX – 9KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: a09ebd25083e768caece9bf4c3a4eed2
  • SHA1: 90e640a2e860f914562a93ca470817fb60df57b8

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 13 of 18 (Zip – 1.7GB)

Content List (XLSX – 9KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: e01993457a54df94672378cd23c243a2
  • SHA1: d898e192edeba36e2c27d0b7cee03382031907a7

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 14 of 18 (Zip – 738MB)

Content List (XLSX – 9KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: 3f82936ac05e587c95f7a733ff9a3070
  • SHA1: e16d5323deab689e6b4d0cdc767ae4fd6e732946

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 15 of 18 (Zip – 844MB)

Content List (XLSX – 9KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: b2e383f97cf1bf790d8e104482ed428e
  • SHA1: 1fff92f371fa2d4a7c2e242a1a211a8be238e7f2

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 16 of 18 (Zip – 1.1GB)

Content List (XLSX – 9KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: 16889e2b011f40a81be9bb027fed8778
  • SHA1: 2066fef7da38fcc8b273d5b5d3ede6284b99ef75

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 17 of 18 (Zip – 1,017MBB)

Content List (XLSX – 9KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: 1430bb74e9fb8518ccba948735e56346
  • SHA1: ed2bda18eb25c258d21a1fd31d1e0ce7bd9357be

 

July 2017 Release – Formerly Withheld in Full – Part 18 of 18 (Zip – 930MB)

Content List (XLSX – 9KB)

Checksum / Hashing functions:

  • MD5: 907c6ca68e40b81ddf8e296485afabcc
  • SHA1: 08c45ace92d781d367eb33e928caf69351f24a07

 

 

 

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BREAKING NEWS: List of Withheld JFK Assassination Documents

February 4, 2016 | Russ Baker

Here It Is — a Map to What We Can Still Learn

President John F. Kennedy prepares to deliver remarksPhoto credit:  John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum / White House

President John F. Kennedy prepares to deliver remarksPhoto credit:  John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum / White House

Exciting news: WhoWhatWhy has obtained the complete list of 3,603 secret documents on the Kennedy assassination still being held by the US government. (Or, to be precise, what it admits to still holding.)

Now we can at least get a peek at what they have been hiding.

The list was obtained in a Freedom of Information Act request by FOIA specialist Michael Ravnitzky, who alerted us.

The complete list is below. You’ll note that some documents are briefly characterized by subject, while others are less clearly identified.

The government has promised to release as many documents as possible in October, 2017, the 25th anniversary of the JFK Records Act, in which Congress mandated that all efforts be made to release everything in Washington’s possession unless an overriding case can be made for withholding in the national interest.

Some — perhaps most — of these documents could be released at that time. Then again, they may be further withheld. The CIA in particular is likely to argue that some are just too sensitive to be made public.

Still, knowing their subject matter makes it easier to press for disclosure, and to hold the government accountable by insisting it justify any continued withholdings.

Those who wish to look at the list should be forewarned that it’s a bit like looking at hieroglyphics. Most of the names and brief references will mean something only to a very few.


What the government is still hiding about the JFK assassination

The National Archives, for the first time ever, released a list of documents related to the assassination that are still shielded from public view.

By Bryan Bender

02/04/16 08:07 PM ESTUpdated 02/04/16 08:14 PM EST

President John F. Kennedy and his wife Jacqueline drive through Dallas shortly before his assassination. | Getty

More than five decades after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, thousands of government files detailing the activities and testimony of shadowy spies, long-deceased witnesses and others with possible knowledge of the events remain shielded from public view.

The government gave a first-ever peek to what’s still out there Thursday, as the National Archives released a list of the 3,063 documents that have been “fully withheld” since JFK’s murder in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963.

The documents listed — released in response to a Freedom of Information Act request from POLITICO, other news organizations and researchers — were collected by the Assassination Records Review Board, an independent panel created by the 1992 JFK Records Act.

That same act requires that all the document on the list be released by October 2017 unless the next president decides to keep them classified.

Based on what has been revealed previously, many of the files are expected to have no direct bearing on Kennedy’s death in Dealey Plaza but could reveal intelligence operations involving Cuba, secret relationships between U.S. spy agencies and unsavory characters during the height of the Cold War, as well as other secrets the U.S. government might have resisted disclosing publicly as part of a full and open investigation at the time.

Cold War scholars have long suspected that many of the still-withheld files will not necessarily shed new light on whether Oswald acted alone. They could, however, help explain why some top officials at the time might have sought to prevent a thorough investigation, out of concern it would require airing the dirty laundry of covert activities.

Yet asked whether there might be any significant revelations about Kennedy’s unsolved murder, Martha Murphy, head of the Archives’ Special Access Branch, told POLITICO last year, “I’ll be honest. I am hesitant to say you’re not going to find out anything about the assassination.”

The Archives says that “certain information has been removed” from the list, including titles and other identifying information, to protect national security, personal privacy and tax information.

Here is a snapshot of what is still being hidden from the public about key figures, probes and other events that the Archives has deemed relevant to the JFK investigation.

Lee Harvey Oswald

Secret CIA “personality” studies of the reported lone assassin fingered by the Warren Commission produced immediately after the assassination have yet to be released, along with a telegram about him from the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City to the State Department a week after the assassination. Oswald, a former Marine who had temporarily defected to the Soviet Union in 1959, is suspected of having visited Mexico City in the weeks before the assassination, reportedly to obtain a visa to travel to Cuba.

There also are hundreds of other pages of undated CIA files that contain classified information on Oswald, including a handwritten note from Yuri Nosenko, a KGB officer who defected from the Soviet Union and also is the subject of numerous other secret transcripts and tapes contained in the withheld records, as well as another document on Oswald’s “contacts with Cuban and Soviet embassies.” The trove also includes a pair of 1959 telegrams — one from the State Department to Moscow and the other from Moscow to Secretary of State Christian Herter — regarding Oswald’s brother Robert.

J. Edgar Hoover

There are a series of communications from the longest-serving and highly secretive FBI director, including one titled “Reaction of Soviet and Communist Party officials to JFK assassination” that he sent to President Lyndon B. Johnson’s chief of staff, Marvin Watson, a week after the assassination; another a few weeks later to the deputy secretary of state for security relating to Oswald; and a series of 1964 memos sent to J. Lee Rankin, the general counsel of the Warren Commission, about Jack Ruby, the Dallas night club owner with mafia ties who killed Oswald two days after the assassination in the basement of the Dallas police station, preventing a trial.

Jacqueline Kennedy

At least five communications are contained in the files from the former first lady to President Lyndon B. Johnson in the days immediately following the assassination.

James Jesus Angleton

Still classified is the top-secret testimony from the chief of the CIA’s counterintelligence branch from 1954 to 1975 before the so-called Church Committee, convened by the U.S. Senate in 1975 to investigate abuses by the spy agency. It was the Church Committee that revealed for the first time that the CIA had hired figures in organized crime with deep ties to Havana to help overthrow the communist government of Fidel Castro, including through assassination attempts.


National Archives reveals JFK declassification plans

Used with permission of Jefferson Morley and JFKFACTS.ORG